Soy Vay!

A Jewish-Asian Barnard Experience

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Anonymous asked: are you guys still operating?! how's the 'Nard?

I’ve been having a shitty semester and I don’t think has used tumblr all semester. Sorry bout that guyz.

A

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Anonymous asked: do you recommend getting a fake id?

Really depends on what your priorities are, in terms of drinking and going out and whatnot. I don’t have a fake, but I usually only go out with friends who are much older and I do not go out often enough for it to be worth it. I also don’t drink and, if I did drink, I would ask my older friends to grant me access to booze.

I would recommend getting a fake if you intend to go out every weekend with a younger crowd (like freshmen or sophomores and probably juniors as well)—people who are younger (especially those who go to colleges that are as insular as Columbia) tend to carry themselves differently than people who are older and bouncers usually pick up on those subtle differences because that is their job. If you’re going out with people who are older (like, seniors or college grads), that’s tricky—on one hand, if you are with a group who carries themselves in a more mature way, you probably won’t get carded because you will blend in, but on another hand it would really suck to get dressed up and to travel only to get turned away at the door while all of your of age friends are admitted, so that’s up to you. I would not recommend getting a fake if you just want to buy alcohol to drink in your dorm because you really could just get an of age friend to do that for you.

I personally recommend making older friends as a semi-alternative to a fake because (a) they might give/buy/sell you booze and (b) if you walk into the right bar with people who are older (especially if they’ve graduated from college and/or especially if the bouncer knows them well), you are far less likely to be carded. There are lots of bars in NYC that are pretty lax on carding, so ask around to find out which ones do and don’t card.

—a

Filed under barnard fake id barnard college college

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Anonymous asked: Today I took my SAT subject tests and all the other kids around me were either in governor school or taking all AP classes. I felt really uncomfortable, because I've only taken a few honor classes and one AP class. I don't know, I felt like everyone was smarter than me.

creepingmyrtle:

First of all, I hope you did well on your subject tests :) I personally hated all the standardized testing when I was going through the process, so congratulations on finishing another round of those. Hopefully you’re finishing up or already done!

Next, there are so many things I want to say I don’t know where to start! I’ve been taking an Introduction to Teaching & Learning class this quarter, and it’s really given me so many tools to talk about education and learning that I just want to share. Here are some bullet points that may be relevant:

  • The SAT tests are not meant to gauge how intelligent you are. Theoretically, the ACT/SAT/SATIIs/etc are meant to indicate college readiness. Unfortunately, for a number of reasons, these tests are flawed. They strongly indicate whether a student is not college ready, but are not great at giving valuable information about students who score above a certain threshold and their college readiness.
  • Intelligence can’t be measured in one test anyway. Like really, what the hell is intelligence? I definitely subscribe to Multiple Intelligences Theory moreso than that an IQ test can determine your intelligence. To excel in math, music, languages, interpersonal relationships, emotional understanding, and the natural sciences all fall under different types of intelligences. We all have our unique talents and skill sets. Obviously the current educational system favors certain types of intelligences, but I personally don’t believe it should be that way.
  • This concept of intelligence shouldn’t bar your ability to learn. A psychologist at Stanford, Carol Dweck, famously introduced the concept of growth mindset. Individuals with a fixed mindset believe in some set innate ability. Fixed mindset individuals take a test and assume the score reflects their intelligence. A growth mindset individual, on the other hand, will look at that score and understand it as simple a gauge of where they are now. A failure to a fixed mindset individual is an opportunity to learn to a growth mindset individual. 

Very long story short, the number of AP classes one takes does not indicate how smart or dumb a person is. I never took AP or Honors classes because my school didn’t offer them, so I don’t have a great gauge of comparing myself that system. But I did take the ACT/SAT/SATIIs and they have never been a reflection of how willing I am to learn. That willingness to learn is what pushed me through high school, keeps me afloat and strong in college, and will carry me through the rest of my life. Not some scores for a three hour test I took when I was seventeen. You are so much more than some basic concept of “smartness” or the number of AP classes you’ve taken or a test score.

Anyway, you’re done with those tests! Celebrate with a treat and enjoy the rest of your day <3

IMPORTANT FOR PROSPIES AND OTHER COLLEGE APPLYING BEINGS

—A

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Anonymous asked: I know you're not an admissions officer, but do you think that an arts supplement could hurt my application if it wasn't 'good'?

soyvay:

Why would you submit it if you didn’t think it was ‘good’? Like, seriously. Would you submit a subpar essay?

—A

Not to discourage anyone from submitting things, but if, by good, you mean I’M A PREPROFESSIONAL BALLERINA AND I WAS CASTED BY THE AMERICAN BALLET THEATER ONCE, then that’s probably not necessary. What I’ve heard about supplementary, un-required things in general (interviews, art supplements, extra recs, etc.) won’t hurt unless they show they’re REALLY bad and/or that you might be a threat to yourself or other people.

—A

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Anonymous asked: I know you're not an admissions officer, but do you think that an arts supplement could hurt my application if it wasn't 'good'?

Why would you submit it if you didn’t think it was ‘good’? Like, seriously. Would you submit a subpar essay?

—A

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Anonymous asked: Hey! :) So i visited a school that i was looking forward too but when i went there, there was like NO diversity at all. maybe minority 5%. it was horrible. i was wondering, honestly would you say there are a variety of different people/religions/ethnicities at barnard? how would you describe it?

So this is actually a really big, really loaded question. I asked a ton of people what they thought about this and I’ve started to write a response a few times, so I hope I can provide a well rounded answer.

Barnard’s website says that Barnard is about 40% people of color, which is certainly a lot more than 5% people of color. But your experiences and perceptions of Barnard’s diversity will be entirely dependent upon your own experiences with diversity. If you grew up in an extremely diverse neighborhood and went to a diverse high school, you might not perceive Barnard as being very diverse, since diversity is something you’ve been exposed to. However, if you grew up in a very white small town, Barnard will probably be the most diverse environment you’ve ever been a part of.

Diversity, in general, is complicated. There are several types of diversity that really can’t be represented in a prestigious college, such as age diversity, diversity in life goals, diversity in world views, diversity in economic class, etc. but there are many types that can be represented in such an environment, and Barnard does a really good job at doing that, compared to other similar colleges and universities.

—A

Filed under barnard barnard college

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Anonymous asked: Hey! I know you guys HATE admissions questions BUTTTT, if I send my application in the middle of October do you think I'll get results earlier than mid-december?

No.

—A

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Anonymous asked: Would you guys mind reading my essay for Barnard ED? I am really really nervous!!

That’s not the purpose of this blog. Good luck, though.

—A

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Anonymous asked: I know I probably sound stupid but I really would like to know the difference between cis, trans, hermaphroditism etc. I have no clue about any of this so I would like to ask. Thanks. :)

No problem at all!

Cis: you are cis when your gender identity corresponds with the gender assigned to you at birth.

Trans: with an asterick, trans* is an umbrella term for anyone whose gender identity does not correspond with the gender assigned to them at birth. This includes male-to-female trans folk (assigned male at birth but are transitioning to female), female-to-male trans folk (assigned female at birth but are transitioning to male), and other gender nonconforming identities that do not lie on the gender binary, such as genderqueer, agender, and others.

Hermaphroditism: when a person has ambiguous genetalia or who, otherwise, does not have an XY or XX sex chromosomes. I’ve usually heard this referred to as “intersex” within the queer community, but that’s probably just within the queer community.

—A

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Anonymous asked: Any recommendations on a gift for Thanksgivukkah gift for a Barnard first year? TIA

A mug that says “male tears” on it. That way, she can drink the patriarchy for breakfast.

—A