Soy Vay!

A Jewish-Asian Barnard Experience

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My poster was accepted to the ACM Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing Conference.

Boston, come at me!

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Anonymous asked: Hi, I'm a UK applicant interested in Barnard, and I'm intending to study history, but the day before my history exam I suffered a pretty traumatic event at home which I think is why (I'm not trying to make excuses for myself!) I got just below an A, despite getting high As throughout the year. I know the US process is holistic, do you think if I explain this on my app it would be okay? I was so upset when I saw the grade :( because this event was out of my control and really shook me up

One grade that isn’t an A will probably not affect your chances, especially if your academic record prior to that is all As, so you likely wouldn’t need to explain it anyway. If it makes you feel better, or if you feel that this traumatic event has affected your application to the point that it just isn’t a strong application (a.e., made you make Bs/Cs in all of your classes, made you fail a class, etc), then you absolutely should explain this situation; I’m pretty sure that Barnard admissions would be sympathetic, but do keep in mind that admissions everywhere are crapshoots.

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ssfunkyfrancisca asked: sorry for bothering you ): one of my classes is full and its one im planning to major in (computer science)... should i panic? what should i do to try to get in that class?

A ton of people drop CS1004, if that’s the one you’re trying to get into, because Adam Cannon scares people off, you probably won’t have a problem getting into that class after a week or so.

But if you are in this situation:

  • Remember that no one has their final program yet. A lot of upperclassmen register for a shitton of classes that they won’t end up actually taking just to ensure that they have a spot. A lot of people start classes and realize that they don’t align with their interests or that classes are too hard, etc. A lot of people will drop these classes in the end.
  • Add yourself to the waitlist. This feature is kinda the best feature that course registration has. If someone drops the course, you get priority to add it.
  • Talk to professors. Especially if the class is smaller, the professor might have some say in who stays and who doesn’t stay. Show genuine interest in the class: if there is an assigned paper in the syllabus for the end of class, have an idea for the paper; read some of the professor’s publications; do the readings and speak up in class.
  • Shop a lot of different classes. CU has so many options, even if you don’t get into the particular class that you want, you might find something else that ends up being you’re favorite class.
  • Remember that you are still a freshman (I’m assuming) and that you still have four years to take these classes. Try again next semester if it’s still a class you’re interested in taking.

Filed under barnard barnard college columbia university

54,007 notes

aroavenger:

meaninglessladders:

aroavenger:

i’m crying oh gosh

TUMBLR PROF ANNOUNCEMENT: If you are trans or nonbinary and you are in the same situation as the student above, email your professors before class starts. I understand that it might be uncomfortable, but generally professors are absolutely happy to accommodate you. I know I always will be!
If your professor does not respond positively, contact the Dean or the campus LGBT+ resource center with a copy of the email and show them that you are concerned about gender discrimination in the classroom. 

Also this is a link to the template I used to write this email, and I’ve seen another similar template going around, and this was extremely helpful.

In case this is useful to any of my prefrosh followers arriving on campus tomorrow.

aroavenger:

meaninglessladders:

aroavenger:

i’m crying oh gosh

TUMBLR PROF ANNOUNCEMENT: If you are trans or nonbinary and you are in the same situation as the student above, email your professors before class starts. I understand that it might be uncomfortable, but generally professors are absolutely happy to accommodate you. I know I always will be!

If your professor does not respond positively, contact the Dean or the campus LGBT+ resource center with a copy of the email and show them that you are concerned about gender discrimination in the classroom. 

Also this is a link to the template I used to write this email, and I’ve seen another similar template going around, and this was extremely helpful.

In case this is useful to any of my prefrosh followers arriving on campus tomorrow.

(via adventuresofcesium)

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Anonymous asked: Do you know what the new first-year dean, Rebecca Grabiner, is like? I just admired Dean Hollibaugh so much; it's a bummer she switched departments..

I don’t know anything about her, sorry.

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Anonymous asked: Is anyone really going to care if we have wall decals? I went to pre-college at Barnard in high school and used wall decals. I KNOW that this particular brand is not damaging. I also used pushpins in the wall and did not get fined or reprimanded. Did I just have a cool RA/housinig inspector or is it actually not that big of a deal?

Reslife is soooo hit or miss with fining. If the room already has walls covered in holes with pealing paint or whatever, no one will care if you put new holes into it. But if the wall is freshly painted (every so often they are), you probably will be fined. It also depends on when the RA is checking your room—if your room is the last room she checks in a very long Reid/Sulz hall, then she will probably be a bit more sloppy in finding things to fine you for. Also, with wall decals, yes, you might think that this particular brand will not leave residue, but if for whatever reason something goes wrong, you’d be screwed if you happened to have the wrong RA; if you do use blue painter’s paint, and something goes wrong with that, you will always have the defense of “but I used blue painter’s paint and that’s allowed.”

Also, do keep in mind that following reslife policies re: room decorations isn’t just about incurring fines, it’s also about keeping the rooms nice for other future residents. Barnard rarely touches up the paint or renovates rooms, so a lot of the rooms are very shabby from years of residents putting holes in the walls, leaving command hook residue, or just being careless in general. This makes the rooms feel grosser, shabbier, uglier, and smaller. You probably shouldn’t leave holes in the walls of your dorms; many more people are going to have to live in that room, which will not feel as nice or homey if there is paint peeling or tons of holes in the walls. Think about it, would you really want to move into a room with peeling paint, sticky command hook residue, and tons of holes in the wall?

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Anonymous asked: Define "extra furniture."

Extra chairs (beanbag chairs, butterfly chairs, etc.), rugs, bedside tables, etc.

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Anonymous asked: Yo! Question. Not at all related to college, but you give fantastic advice. So, I received a bunch of scholarship money and I worked my ass off this summer, so I have a comfortable amount of cash. My mom asked if she could use some of it to pay a bill that's been hanging over our head for some time. Problem is, she didn't direct ask, but she hinted, which pisses me off, but that's our family's way. (I do it, too.) Anyways - ADVICE? Should I use school money to pay the bill, or be selfish? xoxoxo

lol I mean I guess if this is the direction this blog is heading

In a perfect world, people would not be financially responsible for their parents until they were helping pay for their parents to go to a retirement home. But obviously, that doesn’t always happens, as there are a lot of different circumstances that might put way more responsibility (financial or otherwise) on a kid than they should have at their age.

First of all, do not touch your scholarship money unless you are paying tuition with it, end of story. That money is not meant to help out your family, it is meant to help you and to help you be able to attend college when you otherwise wouldn’t be able to.

I guess it depends on the nature and the size of the bill. Like, if this bill isn’t paid and your family will lose heat/electricity/water/lodgings/other important thing if it isn’t paid, then I’d offer to help out, but if it’s a credit card bill that’s been piling up over time because your parents have been purchasing luxuries beyond their means, then I think that should be on them. I’m not sure how big this bill is, obviously, but if you’d have to blow all of your savings to pay off this bill, then leave it, it probably wouldn’t be worth it for you.

If you do decide to help your parents out with this bill, then you should make sure that they repay you at some point. Sit down with them and explain your reasoning for paying the bill (you don’t want the family to lose the house, this bill has been making everyone stressed, you want to help out, whatever) and also explain that this really isn’t and shouldn’t be your responsibility and that you’re being pretty generous and that you would like some kind of assurance that you will be paid back at some point. Set up a payment plan for them or a deadline or whatever needs to happen for you to get your money back because, honestly, a family bill should not be your responsibility.

2 notes

Things not to bring:
Your entire bookcase. Similar to closet, you likely will not read the entire Harry Potter series again during your freshman year (unless you’re really motivated or committed to reading). Books are heavy and take up valuable space.
Cooking materials. Cooking in the quad is logistically difficult and you’re on such a huge meal plan that you kind of don’t need to. I would instead bring: lots of tupperware so you can pack stuff out of the dining halls; either cheap plastic plates, bowls, and silverware or disposable plates, bowls, and silverware; and whatever you need to make your preferred morning beverage (coffee maker, water boiler, keurig, blender, whatever).
Storage units and additional furniture. You might need these, you might not, but you will not know until you have unpacked and have fully moved in. There are many rooms in the quad where you would be hard pressed to find space for additional storage units and furniture. And many rooms provide sufficient storage that you just won’t need under bed storage units.
Office supplies that you wouldn’t have used in high school. A lot of large “what you need for college” lists tell you that you need office supplies galore, but you really only need what you know works for your study habits. Only buy stuff that you use habitually because the rest will collect dust in its packaging in the back of your desk.
Things on Barnard’s prohibited items list. Some of these things aren’t very obvious, so do double check as you finalize your packing.
Do bring:
An entire semester’s worth of all toiletries. This includes: toothpaste, shower stuff, feminine hygiene products (try something reusable), cosmetics, medications, etc. It’s a pain to have to buy this shit and it’s also nice if you can get your parents to buy it for you while you’re at home. Also, this shit is expensive in NYC.
A lot of socks and underwear. Most college students don’t do laundry as much as they should. Most things can be re-worn for days, but socks and underwear? Not so much. I did laundry three times this summer while living in a house where the nearest laundry facilities were sorta far away on the other side of a big hill and where my only transportation was a kinda shitty bike—could not have done this without like a month’s supply of socks and underwear.
Slippers. You can use your shower shoes for this purpose, but warm slippers really help make the linoleum floor feel more inviting if you don’t feel like buying a rug. (Rugs are a bitch to store.)
Bathrobe and turbie twist. I had never used either of these until this summer and they’ve made my life way easier.
A stapler. You will likely need this for all of your classes. Your professors likely will not bring one to class the day that problem sets or papers are due and it’s awkward to sheepishly ask the desk attendant in Sulz to use their stapler every time you have a p-set due.
Hangers. Okay so maybe this is just something that I forgot, but my brother forgot it too, so I’m guessing it’s a commonly forgotten item.
Over the door hangers. So many of you freak out over the fact that Barnard strictly forbids command hooks, but forget that these beauties exist. Get them and put them on your door if you are pissed that command hooks aren’t allowed.
Blue painter’s tape. You will want to decorate your room immediately. You will forget this. It is expensive af in Morningside Heights. Buy it at Walmart or something.
Power strip. Power outlets are rarely well placed in the quad.
Anonymous said:

about hangers - THEY ARE SO IMPORTANT AND I SO FORGOT THEM AND THEY ARE SO EXPENSIVE IN NEW YORK. Try to buy thin hangers to save space (this may be Sulz-specific, but it’s way more important than you think) OR the type that have little hooks on them for dresses/rompers/camis. I’d also strongly suggest a steamer. If not, hang wrinkled clothes up in the showers while you’re in there (as close to the shower as possible BUT DON’T DROP THEM) and it works just as well. Wish I knew that a lot sooner!

Yeah seriously! Bed Bath And Beyond have hangers that can hold like three or five garments each, too… they’re pricey, but they’re great for utilizing space. As for bringing a steamer: I would recommend bringing as few articles as possible that require steaming or ironing. Yeah, business professional or whatever, but (a) you’re not going to dress business professional all that much unless you get an internship that requires it and (b) you can get nylon button down shirts instead of linen button down shirts and you will not have to iron them.

Things not to bring:

  • Your entire bookcase. Similar to closet, you likely will not read the entire Harry Potter series again during your freshman year (unless you’re really motivated or committed to reading). Books are heavy and take up valuable space.
  • Cooking materials. Cooking in the quad is logistically difficult and you’re on such a huge meal plan that you kind of don’t need to. I would instead bring: lots of tupperware so you can pack stuff out of the dining halls; either cheap plastic plates, bowls, and silverware or disposable plates, bowls, and silverware; and whatever you need to make your preferred morning beverage (coffee maker, water boiler, keurig, blender, whatever).
  • Storage units and additional furniture. You might need these, you might not, but you will not know until you have unpacked and have fully moved in. There are many rooms in the quad where you would be hard pressed to find space for additional storage units and furniture. And many rooms provide sufficient storage that you just won’t need under bed storage units.
  • Office supplies that you wouldn’t have used in high school. A lot of large “what you need for college” lists tell you that you need office supplies galore, but you really only need what you know works for your study habits. Only buy stuff that you use habitually because the rest will collect dust in its packaging in the back of your desk.
  • Things on Barnard’s prohibited items listSome of these things aren’t very obvious, so do double check as you finalize your packing.

Do bring:

  • An entire semester’s worth of all toiletries. This includes: toothpaste, shower stuff, feminine hygiene products (try something reusable), cosmetics, medications, etc. It’s a pain to have to buy this shit and it’s also nice if you can get your parents to buy it for you while you’re at home. Also, this shit is expensive in NYC.
  • A lot of socks and underwear. Most college students don’t do laundry as much as they should. Most things can be re-worn for days, but socks and underwear? Not so much. I did laundry three times this summer while living in a house where the nearest laundry facilities were sorta far away on the other side of a big hill and where my only transportation was a kinda shitty bike—could not have done this without like a month’s supply of socks and underwear.
  • Slippers. You can use your shower shoes for this purpose, but warm slippers really help make the linoleum floor feel more inviting if you don’t feel like buying a rug. (Rugs are a bitch to store.)
  • Bathrobe and turbie twist. I had never used either of these until this summer and they’ve made my life way easier.
  • A stapler. You will likely need this for all of your classes. Your professors likely will not bring one to class the day that problem sets or papers are due and it’s awkward to sheepishly ask the desk attendant in Sulz to use their stapler every time you have a p-set due.
  • Hangers. Okay so maybe this is just something that I forgot, but my brother forgot it too, so I’m guessing it’s a commonly forgotten item.
  • Over the door hangers. So many of you freak out over the fact that Barnard strictly forbids command hooks, but forget that these beauties exist. Get them and put them on your door if you are pissed that command hooks aren’t allowed.
  • Blue painter’s tape. You will want to decorate your room immediately. You will forget this. It is expensive af in Morningside Heights. Buy it at Walmart or something.
  • Power strip. Power outlets are rarely well placed in the quad.

Anonymous said:

about hangers - THEY ARE SO IMPORTANT AND I SO FORGOT THEM AND THEY ARE SO EXPENSIVE IN NEW YORK. Try to buy thin hangers to save space (this may be Sulz-specific, but it’s way more important than you think) OR the type that have little hooks on them for dresses/rompers/camis. I’d also strongly suggest a steamer. If not, hang wrinkled clothes up in the showers while you’re in there (as close to the shower as possible BUT DON’T DROP THEM) and it works just as well. Wish I knew that a lot sooner!

Yeah seriously! Bed Bath And Beyond have hangers that can hold like three or five garments each, too… they’re pricey, but they’re great for utilizing space. As for bringing a steamer: I would recommend bringing as few articles as possible that require steaming or ironing. Yeah, business professional or whatever, but (a) you’re not going to dress business professional all that much unless you get an internship that requires it and (b) you can get nylon button down shirts instead of linen button down shirts and you will not have to iron them.

Filed under college college bound move in dorm dorms dorm shopping college dorms class of 2018

1 note

Anonymous asked: Can you have overnight visitors during NSOP?

Yes, but please please please make sure it’s okay with your roommate(s) first.